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Processes

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Electroforming

A process used for making molds for plastics processes, usually those employing low or moderate pressures, comprising electroplating a pattern which is usually of wax or flexible material. [PE]

 

Electroplating on Plastics

Articles of almost any common plastic can be plated by conventional processes used for metals, after their surfaces have been rendered conductive by precipitation of silver or other conductive substance.  A layer of copper is usually applied first, followed by a final plating of gold, silver, chrome or nickel.  ABS resins have been most widely used for articles to be electroplated, especially in the automotive industry.

Source: Whittington, Lloyd R.  Whittington's Dictionary of Plastics (Stamford, CT: Technomic, 1968).

 

Embedding

The process of encasing an article in a resinous mass performed by placing the article in a mold, pouring a liquid resin into the mold to completely surround the article, curing the resin and removing the encased article form the mold. In the case of electrical components, the lead wires or terminals may protrude from the embedment.  The main difference between embedding and potting is that in potting the mold is a container which remains fixed to the resinous mass.

Source: Whittington, Lloyd R.  Whittington's Dictionary of Plastics (Stamford, CT: Technomic, 1968).

 

Embossing

Techniques used to create depressions of a specific pattern in plastics film or sheeting.  In the case of cast films, embossing can be accomplished directly by casting on a textured belt or roll.  Calendered films are frequently embossed by rollers just after the calendaring process. Other films or coated fabrics can be embossed subsequent to manufacture be reheating and passing through embossing rollers, or compressing between plates. Extruded sheets, up to 1/8” or thicker, are commonly embossed as the sheets emerge form the extruder.

Source: Whittington, Lloyd R.  Whittington's Dictionary of Plastics (Stamford, CT: Technomic, 1968).

 

Extrusion Blow Molding

Extrusion blow molding can be used to process many different polymers including polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene and more. The process begins with the conventional downward extrusion of a tube. When the tube reaches the desired length the mold is closed catching and holding the neck end open and pinching the bottom end closed. Then a blow-pin is inserted into the neck end of the hot tube to form the threaded opening and inflate the tube inside the mold cavity. When the mold is completely cooled it is opened to eject the bottle and the excess plastic is trimmed from the neck and bottom areas.

http://www.plasticmolding.ca/techniques/blow_molding.htm

 

Extrusion Laminating

A laminating process in which a plastic layer is extruded between two layers of substrate. 

Source: Whittington, Lloyd R.  Whittington's Dictionary of Plastics (Stamford, CT: Technomic, 1968).

 

Extrusion Molding

The process of compacting of a plastifiable material and forcing it through an orifice to form continuous shapes.  Typical shapes extruded are hose, tubing, flat films and sheets, jackets around electrical wires, parisons for blow molding, filaments and fibers, strands for pelletizing, and webs for coating and laminating.